Feb. 28, 6:00pm - March 3, 2:00pm, 2017 · Gainesville, Florida

The frank gathering is a pipeline for creating new strategies and talent that drive social change. Communications professionals, academics, researchers, artists, philanthropists, business leaders and advocates – they come together to connect evidence to action for on-the-ground impact. People arrive hungry for solutions, become humbled by the challenge and leave empowered to make big change.

Our theme this year is curiosity, an essential ingredient for empathy, drawing attention and driving change.

Join us for three days to connect with the movement builders and changemakers who use strategic communications to drive positive social change. You will hear talks filled with deep scientific and psychological insights, the latest communication strategies, and hear from influentials working on the front line of the current issues. We also make sure you  have countless opportunities to ask questions and learn from one another.

Breaks are filled with Scrums and Skills. These session are an hour and half training or conversation held in coffee shops, restaurants and small spaces around Gainesville. A scrum might focus on a specific question like, “How can we use popular media to advance social justice?” Skills sessions offer opportunities to share your knowledge and skill with the frank community. They are similar to a training session, but not as structured.

Check out the agenda here and our speaker line up below.

We are forever grateful to our sponsors and their continued commitment to frank and public interest communications.

  • Atlantic Philanthropies
  • Al and Nancy Burnett Charitable Foundation
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • The Karel Endowment for Public Interest Communications
  • UF College of Journalism and Communications.
  • Visit Gainesville

Please contact frank@jou.ufl.edu for information on becoming a sponsor.

 

  • Rob Anderson
    U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP)

    Rob Anderson is Vice President, Global Communications, at USP, a global public health organization advancing the quality of medicines, dietary supplements and food ingredients.

    In his role at USP, he guides strategic communications initiatives to strengthen relationships with important stakeholder audiences, promote USP’s scientific work and product offerings, and improve understanding of the organization’s impact on global health around the world. He oversees teams focused on communications and media relations, digital engagement, marketing and promotions and creative services.

    In 2015, he led a research project to identify components of organizational curiosity and an assessment tool with the goal of building a team’s curiosity to achieve new discoveries and breakthroughs.

  • Dan Ariely
    Psychology & Behavioral Economics, Duke University

    Despite our intentions, why do we so often fail to act in our own best interest? Why do we promise to skip the chocolate cake, only to find ourselves drooling our way into temptation when the dessert tray rolls around? Why do we overvalue things that we’ve worked to put together? What are the forces that influence our behavior? Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University, is dedicated to answering these questions and others in order to help people live more sensible – if not rational – lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors, and his sometimes unusual experiments are consistently interesting, amusing and informative, demonstrating profound ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom.

    He is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, co-creator of the film documentary (Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies, and a three-time New York Times bestselling author. His books include Predictably IrrationalThe Upside of IrrationalityThe Honest Truth About Dishonesty, and Irrationally Yours. His next book, Payoff, will be published in November 2016.

    In 2013 Bloomberg recognized Dan as one of Top 50 Most Influential thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called “Ask Ariely.” Dan can be found at www.danariely.com.

  • Carroll Bogert
    The Marshall Project

    Carroll is president of The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organization focusing on criminal justice issues in the US. Staff journalists at The Marshall Project cover mass incarceration, race and police abuse, the death penalty, juvenile justice, and immigration, among other topics. Their articles are published in partnership with mainstream outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, Vice, Wired and many local media. In 2016, The Marshall Project became the youngest news organization ever to win the Pulitzer Prize. Bogert was previously Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, a research and advocacy organization working in 90 countries around the world. She began her career as a foreign correspondent for Newsweek, based in China, southeast Asia, and the Soviet Union.

  • Caty Borum Chattoo
    Center for Media & Social Impact, American University

    Caty Borum Chattoo is Co-Director of the Center for Media & Social Impact (CMSI), a research center and innovation lab at American University focused on media for social change; and Executive in Residence at American University’s School of Communication. Working at the intersection of social-change communication strategy, documentary production and media research, she has produced three documentary feature films (Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, The After Party and Stand Up Planet), multiple half-hour documentary TV specials, a seven-part documentary TV series (Sierra Club Chronicles), and PSA campaigns designed for social change on issues ranging from global poverty to civic engagement.

    Her social-change research, strategy and storytelling work has been featured in The New York Times, NPR, USA Today and more, and her documentaries have aired in the U.S. and internationally on the Sundance Channel, Pivot, NDTV (India), PBS World, Link TV, and KCET. Through CMSI, she recently co-created and launched a new convening and project, Story Movements, which examines story-led movements for social change. She has been a featured international and national speaker on the topic of media storytelling for social change, at film festivals as well as academic and professional convenings and she is a regular contributor to Documentary magazine, the leading trade publication for non-fiction storytelling. Formerly, she was a senior vice president in behavior-change communication at FleishmanHillard International Communications.

  • Eric Deggans
    Author & NPR TV critic

    Eric Deggans is NPR’s first full-time TV critic, crafting stories and commentaries for the network’s shows, such as Morning Edition, Here & Now and All Things Considered, along with writing material for NPR.org and the website’s blogs such as Code Switch, Monkey See and The Two Way. He came to NPR in September 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times newspaper in Florida, where he served as TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than two decades, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012 by Palgrave Macmillan

  • Ram Devineni
    Priya’s Shakti

    Ram Devineni produced and co-wrote Priya’s Shaktiand Priya’s Mirror,  a comic book and augmented reality production. The comic features a new superhero, one that has arisen in India in the wake of the brutal gang rape on a Delhi bus two years ago: Priya, a mortal woman who is raped herself, but fights back against sexual violence with the help of the goddess Parvati — and a tiger.

    The comic book was honored by UN Women as a “gender equality champion” and recently the next edition titled,“Priya’s Mirror” about acid attacks was released at the New York Film Festival at Lincoln Center, and funded by the World Bank’s WEvolve Global Initiative.

    Devineni is also a filmmaker who recently received the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival and nominated for an Independent Spirit Award. He is the founder of Rattapallax films, press, and magazine, based in New York City, São Paulo, and New Delhi.

  • James Druckman
    frank research prize finalist

    James N. Druckman is the Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University.  His article, co-authored with Toby Bolsen,  Counteracting the Politicization of Science was chosen as one of three finalists for the frank research prize.

    Druckman is also an Honorary Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research focuses on political preference formation and communication. His recent work examines how citizens make political, economic, and social decisions in various contexts (e.g., settings with multiple competing messages, online information, deliberation). He also researches the relationship between citizens’ preferences and public policy, and how political elites make decisions under varying institutional conditions.

    Druckman has published roughly 100 articles and book chapters in political science, communication, economic, science, and psychology journals. He co-authored the book Who Governs? Presidents, Public Opinion, and Manipulation (University of Chicago Press) and co-edited the Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science. He has served as editor of the journals Political Psychology and Public Opinion Quarterly as well as the University of Chicago Press’s series in American Politics. He currently is the co-Principal Investigator of Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS). He also sits on numerous advisory boards, organizing committees, prize committees, and editorial boards.

  • Bridgit Evans
    Fuel | We Power Change

    As the founder and President of Fuel | We Power Change, Bridgit is widely recognized as one of the foremost thought leaders in the culture change strategy field. Fifteen years of work at the intersection of pop culture storytelling and social justice has evolved into a vision for a new, hybrid culture change field in which creative and social justice leaders work hand-in-hand to create and distribute stories that can shape the values, beliefs and narratives. In 2008, Bridgit founded Fuel as the permanent home for collaborations with leading social change innovators. She now designs long-term culture change strategies for social justice movements that use transportive story experiences, often in the pop culture realm, to shift long-held narratives, values, beliefs and behaviors of mass audiences. Prior strategy design commissions include NYCLU/ACLU’s Policing and Culture strategy, Make It Work, National Domestic Workers Alliance’s Caring Across Generations and #BeTheHelp campaigns. Currently, Bridgit designs culture change strategy for Unbound Philanthropy and consults on narrative change and audience engagement strategies for Ford Foundation.

  • Lisa Fazio
    frank research prize finalist

    Lisa Fazio studies how people learn new information, both true and false, and how to correct errors in people’s knowledge. Her article, Knowledge Does Not Protect Against Illusory Truth, was chosen as one of three finalist for the frank research prize.  Fazio received her PhD from Duke University in 2010 and completed postdoctoral fellowships at both Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, her research focuses on improving student learning using basic principles from cognitive and developmental psychology. She examines simple knowledge such as history facts, as well as more complex forms of knowledge such as mathematics. Her research informs basic theories about learning and memory, while also having clear applications for the real world and classroom practice.

  • Charles Fishman
    Author/Journalist

    Curiosity got Charles Fishman admitted to the only bomb factory in the United States. It got him into the engine room of the largest cruise ship ever constructed. Curiosity got Fishman into the busiest maternity ward in the U.S., and to the bottom of the second deepest mine ever dug in the world. For a while, curiosity got Fishman a job as a tugboat deckhand on the Mississippi River.

    And not too long ago, Fishman spent two years thinking about curiosity fulltime, to write the #1 New York Times bestselling book, ‘A Curious Mind,’ with Hollywood producer Brian Grazer.

    Charles Fishman is an award-winning investigative reporter and bestselling author, which is to say, he’s turned curiosity into both a passion and a profession.

    In the first half of his career, Fishman worked for daily newspapers — The Washington Post, The Orlando Sentinel, and then the News & Observer in Raleigh, NC. In the second half of his career, he has been a magazine writer and the author of two other bestsellers, “The Wal-Mart Effect” and “The Big Thirst,” about our relationship with water.

    In the last five years, Fishman has become a forceful and challenging voice on the importance of water as a public issue, speaking everywhere from MIT and UCLA to Hershey chocolate and The Hague.

    He is at work on his next book, about the race to the Moon in the 1960s.

  • Andy Goodman
    The Goodman Center

    Andy Goodman is co-founder and director of The Goodman Center, which teaches communications professionals and social changemakers how to reach more people with more impact. Along with Storytelling as Best Practice, he is author of Why Bad Ads Happen to Good Causes and Why Bad Presentations Happen to Good Causes. He also publishes a monthly journal, free-range thinking, to share best practices in the field of public interest communications.

    Andy is internationally known for his speeches and workshops on storytelling, presenting, and strategic communications, and has been invited to speak at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton, the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, as well as at many national nonprofit conferences.

    He is currently developing curriculum for the College for Social Innovation and recently designed a course on storytelling and presenting skills for the African Leadership University. When not teaching, traveling, or recovering from teaching and traveling, Andy serves on the board of directors of Imagine LA, a nonprofit working to end family homelessness in Los Angeles.

  • Luisa Guaracao
    Karel Fellow

    Luisa Guaracao is a public relations major at the University of Florida. She is a published writer, a devoted student and already has experience in the nonprofit sector. In 2015, Luisa directed a two-week summer camp for more than 70 Guatemalan migrant children hosted by an organization called SALTT. Luisa’s leadership role with SALTT, as well as her involvement with the frank conference at UF, have inspired her to pursue the field of public interest communications as a career.

    For the 2016 summer, Luisa was matched with The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights – a coalition dedicated to promoting and protecting civil and human rights in the United States. Through advocacy and outreach to targeted constituencies, The Leadership Conference works toward the goal of a more open and just society.

  • Jamie Henn
    350.org

    Jamie Henn is the Co-founder and Strategy and Communications Director at 350.org, an international climate campaign. Over the past 8 years, 350.org has coordinated over 20,000 climate rallies in more than 180 countries, helped win the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, spearheaded the growing fossil fuel divestment campaign, and co-organized the largest climate march in history, the People’s Climate March. Today, 350.org continues to push the envelope of creative campaigning, while exploring the intersections between climate, racial, economic, and social justice.

    Jamie has guided 350’s strategy from its infancy as a group of seven college friends and their professor to one of the leading environmental organizations on the planet. His communications work has ranged from getting 1,200 people arrested at the White House, to producing shows with Thom Yorke and Patti Smith, to leading trainings for hundreds of Chinese youth activists. He’s a passionate believer that great campaigns need great stories. Helping to get those stories told is the adventure of a lifetime.

  • Sarah Jaffe
    Author and Journalist

    Sarah Jaffe is a Nation Institute fellow and an independent journalist. Her book Necessary Trouble: American in Revolt  is the definitive book on the movements that are poised to permanently remake American Politics. (Public Affairs Review)

    Her work has appeared in the Nation, Salon, In These Times, Washington Post, Atlantic, and more. She is the cohost of Dissent magazine’s Belabored podcast, as well as an editorial board member at Dissent and a columnist at New Labor Forum. Follow her on Twitter @sarahljaffe.

  • Leena Jayaswal
    Film & Media Arts Division, American University

    Leena Jayaswal is an award-winning photographer and documentarian with deep expertise and interest in issues that intersect race, representation and identity. Her films have been broadcast throughout the country on PBS affiliates through National Educational Telecommunications Association, and through New Day Films. She was awarded the prestigious Gracie Allen Award from the American Women in Radio and Television. Her work has been featured in critical film festivals and newspapers for the Indian diaspora. Her photography has been nationally recognized in galleries around the country. She has worked with famed photographer, Mary Ellen Mark. Jayaswal is an Associate Professor in the Film and Media Arts Division of the School of Communication at American University. She is the director of the photography concentration.

  • Ibram Kendi
    Professor and author

    Ibram X. Kendi is a New York Times best-selling author and award-winning historian at the University of Florida. His second book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction and was recently named a finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award. Described as “engrossing and relentless” by The Washington Post, Stamped has named to Best Books of 2016 lists in the Boston Globe, Kirkus, The Root, Chicago Review of Books, and Buzzfeed. Stamped has also been nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Nonfiction.

    Kendi is a hardcore humanist and softcore vegan who enjoys joking it up with friends and family, partaking in African American culture, weight lifting, reading provocative non-fiction books, discussing the issues of the day with open-minded people, and hoping and pressing for the day the New York Knicks will win an NBA championship and for the day this nation and world will be ruled by the best of humanity.

    Kendi is also the author of  The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972. His has been published in The New York Times, Salon, Black Perspectives, New York Daily News and has received research appointments and grants from a variety of universities, foundations, professional associations, and libraries, including the American Historical Association, Library of Congress, National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Lyndon B. Johnson Library & Museum, Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Brown University, Princeton University and others.

    Kendi lives in Gainesville, Florida.

  • Bobby Jones
    Peace First

    Bobby Jones is one of the nation’s most respected experts in marketing to teen and millennial audiences. He is the co-author of the new book Good is the New Cool: Market Like You Give Damn, a bold manifesto and how to guide helping marketers to address environmental, civic, and economic issues in ways that grow their business and brand, while giving marketing a renewed sense of purpose as powerful forces for good. Bobby is currently Chief Marketing and Communications Officer (CMCO) of Peace First, where he leads all of its marketing and communications efforts to help young people in all 50 states in the US and in over 90 countries around the world to be powerful peacemakers, creating compassionate solutions to global and local injustices. Prior to Peace First, Bobby was Vice President at Octagon North America, where he led the Octagon Access group, the nation’s preeminent team for global brands looking to effectively leverage sports, music and entertainment to reach millennial and multicultural consumers.

  • Trey Kay
    Us & Them

    Trey Kay is creator, host and producer of the Us & Them podcast. For years, he’s reported on how culture war battles have affected education in America. In 2009, he produced the radio documentary “The Great Textbook War,” which was honored with Peabody, Murrow, and duPont-Columbia Awards. In 2013, he produced “The Long Game: Texas’ Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom,” which he researched as a Spencer Fellow for Education Reporting at the Columbia School of Journalism. In 2005, he shared in another Peabody for his contribution to Studio 360’s “American Icons: Moby Dick.” He’s also produced for This American Life, The New Yorker Radio Hour, Marketplace, American RadioWorks, Morning Edition, Inside Appalachia and PBS Frontline. Kay has taught at the Columbia School of Journalism and at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY.

  • Shanelle Matthews
    Black Lives Matter

    Shanelle Matthews serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, a network of more than 40 chapters working to rebuild the Black liberation movement and affirm the lives of Black people.

    Shanelle is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism, legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. Previous to her work with BLM, she served as the Deputy Communications Director for the Sierra Club, leading communications strategy for Beyond Coal and worked as a strategist for the ACLU of Northern California. She believes in using communications both as a tool for social change and to win. As an alumna of Progressive Women’s Voices, Shanelle has executed her training as a spokesperson in outlets like Al Jazeera and NPR.

  • Sarah McBride
    Human Rights Campaign Foundation

    Bio: Sarah McBride is the National Press Secretary at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.  Prior to joining HRC, Sarah was the Campaigns and Communications Manager for LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress. Sarah completed her undergraduate degree at American University, where she served as student body president and made national headlines when she came out as transgender in the student newspaper.

    A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Sarah currently serves on the Board of Directors of Equality Delaware, the state’s primary LGBT-advocacy and -educational organization. In that capacity, Sarah helped lead and served as the primary spokesperson for the successful effort to add gender identity and expression to her state’s nondiscrimination and hate-crimes laws during the 2013 legislative session. Sarah has worked for Governor Jack Markell (D-DE), former Attorney General Beau Biden (D-DE), and, in 2013, interned at the White House, the first out trans woman to intern there. In 2016, Sarah became the first out transgender person to address a major party convention when she spoke at the Democratic National Convention.

  • Amy Ray
    Indigo Girls

    Many artists, musical and otherwise, use their craft to provide a visible platform for the issues they believe in. Their activism becomes interwoven with their art. Indigo Girls have long been known for voicing their political and social views in both their actions and song.  They have emphasized the need to work against sexism, racism, queer-phobia, and to work across the lines of rural and urban definitions, within all of their community-based activism, to build coalitions in order to bring true liberation to us all and truth to power.

    Amy Ray teamed up with Emily Saliers and in 1981, their independent music career began with a basement recording called Tuesday’s Children. They signed with Epic Records in 1988. Despite almost polar-opposite styles, they met on the common ground of harmony and the love of meaningful music. 

    They have an extremely loyal fan base and sold millions of albums and garnered numerous awards. To give back what was given to them, Ray founded the not-for-profit Daemon Records in 1990. The label’s mission is to support local artists at a grassroots level, to teach young artists how to further their own careers, and to keep the independent spirit alive. Ellen James Society, Kristen Hall, Gerard McHugh, James Hall and others were part of Daemon.

    Amy Ray embarked on a solo career in 2000 but still records as the Indigo Girls.  In early 2014, Ray released Goodnight Tender, her first country album. Guests on the set of tunes include Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, and Susan Tedeschi. In 2015, Indigo Girls released One Lost Day. 

  • Rashad Robinson
    Color of Change

    Rashad Robinson is the Executive Director of Color Of Change, the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. As a force driven by over one million members, Color Of Change moves decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. 

    Rashad leads the Color Of Change team in developing strategies powerful enough to change the rules of the many systems that affect Black people’s lives. Color Of Change campaigns have won justice for Black people hurt or killed by anti-Black violence, putting local authorities on notice for their abuses. They have prevented attempts to suppress the Black vote, and eliminated certain voter intimidation tactics from the conservative playbook. Long-term strategic initiatives targeting corporate industries have, for example, forced news and entertainment outlets to represent Black people accurately and fairly, and acknowledge their role in creating dangerously widespread implicit bias. Under Rashad’s leadership, Color Of Change continues to seize opportunities for advancing the power, freedom and wellbeing of Black workers, students, families, farmers, immigrants and others, wherever their freedom is limited or threatened.

    Prior to his work at Color Of Change, Rashad served as Senior Director of Media Programs at GLAAD, where he led the organization’s programmatic and advocacy work to transform the representation of LGBT people in news and entertainment media. Before GLAAD, Rashad worked on racial justice and voting rights at the Right to Vote Campaign and FairVote.

  • Jackie Salg
    Karel Fellow

    Jaquelin Salg  is an American studies major at Franklin and Marshall College – originally from New Haven, Connecticut. Jaquelin is described by her faculty sponsor as “articulate, curious, and passionate about using her education and talents to improve the lives of others.” While in high school, Jacquelin established an organization that helped families struggling to meet their food needs. The idea was to fill backpacks with canned and nonperishable foods for struggling students to pick up each Friday or before extended breaks.

    Appropriately, Jaquelin was assigned to work with Martha’s Table. For decades, Martha’s Table has provided an array of services to Washington, D.C. residents and their families. What began in 1979 as a safe place for neighborhood children to eat and learn after school has blossomed into an organization that offers access to food, education and opportunity for children and families.

  • Kimberly Sanford
    Karel Fellow

    Kimberly Sanford  attends Harvard College, majoring in studies of women, gender and sexuality, with a minor in government. She is a proud first-generation college student who is committed to helping the next generation overcome challenges however she can. At Harvard, Kimberly serves as a full-time mentor for the Crimson Summer Academy, which hosts low-income Boston students as they navigate college admissions. As a mentor, she had the opportunity to teach an introductory writing class focused on gender and sexuality – a topic she’s demonstrated an obvious passion for. Kimberly is also a Jack Kent Cooke Scholar.

    For her fellowship, Kimberly was paired with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). NRDC works to safeguard the earth – its people, its plant and animals, and the natural system on which all life depends. NRDC strives to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water and the wild.

  • Ellen Schneider
    Active Voice Lab

    Ellen has pioneered social justice media strategies for over 20 years. She founded and leads Active Voice Lab, which helps funders, media makers, advocates, and other leaders use story skillfully to advance progressive social change. She has spearheaded practical tools — such as ThePrenups and HowDoWeKnow.net — that have supported creative collaborations In the U.S. and abroad.  In 2001, with support from MacArthur and Ford Foundations, she founded Active Voice, one of the first teams to leverage story-based media to put human faces on complex social and policy issues. Ellen was formerly the executive producer of P.O.V.,/American Documentary, which she expanded from an acquisition series to an influential public media innovator. In Hollywood, she worked in development and production on cause-oriented original movies. Recent clients include media-savvy pioneers like Atlantic Philanthropies, Sundance, and Participant Media. She is currently developing an initiative called What Would it Take?, which will imagine the factors necessary to increase peer learning across sectors.

  • Andrew Slack
    Harry Potter Alliance, Imagine Better

    Andrew Slack is an Ashoka fellow, Civic Imagination fellow at Civic Hall, and former Nathan Cummings Foundation fellow. He’s the creator of both the Harry Potter Alliance (HPA) and Imagine Better.

    In the HPA, he has created a worldwide organization with close to 300 active chapters in over 30 countries on six continents. He has directed campaigns that have sent five cargo planes to Haiti, allowed all Harry Potter chocolate to be either Utz or Fair Trade certified, built libraries across the world.

    As head of Imagine Better, Andrew has directed fan-led campaigns around Star Wars  and money in politics, Back to the Future and imagination, Superman and immigration, and the Hunger Games and economic inequality. He has also begun working with fans in remixing holidays with projects like #TeachMeYouDid and assisting in Esther Day through establishing partnerships with MTV and Sesame Workshop.

    His methodology, known as “cultural acupuncture,” has been profiled in Henry Jenkins’ recent book, “By Any Media Necessary,” in the PBS documentary, “Is School Enough?,” and helped influence a major white paper that set the stage for a 65 million dollar MacArthur study.

    Andrew has been profiled by the New Yorker, NYT, NPR, Fast Company, Forbes, etc and he has written for both the LA Times and CNN.com He has served as keynote speaker at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum, the American Library Association’s midwinter festival, was chair of MacArthur’s Digital Media Learning’s Ignite Talks, and has done talks at TEDx, Comic Con, Futures of Entertainment, and SXSW.

  • Brian Southwell, Ph.D.
    RTI International, Duke University & UNC

    Brian’s hats are many! He is the Director of the Science in the Public Sphere Program in the Center for Communication Science at RTI International, an independent, nonprofit research institute. He is an Adjunct Professor with Duke University, teaching through the Social Science Research Institute and Energy Initiative, and is Research Professor (of Mass Communication) and Adjunct Associate Professor (of Health Behavior) at UNC Chapel Hill. In addition, Southwell hosts The Measure of Everyday Life, a weekly public radio show produced by WNCU in the Raleigh-Durham, NC, media market.

    Previously, Dr. Southwell served the University of Minnesota as Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies (Mass Communication) with an appointment in Public Health. Additionally, he has worked for nonprofit and government organizations including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Ogilvy Public Relations. His research addressed issues such as campaign measurement and evaluation, the roles of social networks, lifespan development, and misinformation. At RTI, Dr. Southwell has led numerous projects for federal agencies.

    Dr. Southwell’s book, Social Networks and Popular Understanding of Science and Health, has been widely reviewed and recognized as an outstanding publication in 2015.

  • Taylor Tringali
    Florida Fellow

    Taylor Tringali is a senior studying sociology and communications at the University of Florida.

    Taylor was chosen to be a Florida Fellow in the summer of 2016 with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation in Fort Myers, Florida. She was matched with the Alliance for the Arts, a non-profit arts organization, where she  updated their social media platforms, created a strategic campaign to advocate for the importance of arts education, collected data for the Economic Impact Study and more.

    Taylor has dedicated herself to community service through her service sorority and has worked to become a voice for women on campus as the Marketing Director for the Women’s Student Association. She has also volunteered with various community social service organizations throughout her college career.

  • Sander Van der Linden
    frank research prize finalist

    Sander van der Linden is an Assistant Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, where he directs the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab. He is also a Fellow in Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Churchill College, University of Cambridge and a research affiliate with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication at Yale University.

    Prior to Cambridge, van der Linden was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychology and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at Yale University. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) exploring the social psychology of climate change.

    Sander has won numerous awards for his research on social influence, judgment, communication, and decision-making, including awards from the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) and the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP). His article, The Conspiracy-Effect: Exposure to Conspiracy Theories (about Global Warming) Decreases Prosocial Behavior and Science Acceptance was selected as one of three frank research prize finalists. He was nominated as one of the “Top Thinkers Under 30” by Pacific Standard Magazine (although he is now 30!) and actively strives to conduct psychological research in the public interest. His work has been widely publicized in the media, including outlets such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, NPR, and the BBC.

  • Frank Waddell
    College of Journalism and Communication

    Frank is interested in the ways that nascent trends in digital media (e.g., dual screen interaction) are moderating the psychological effects that media elicit. His research focuses on the ability of emerging media to serve as a source of communication, both individually and collectively. This includes technologies that either allow users to express themselves (e.g., avatar-mediated communication, video games) or that afford the ability to monitor the collective sentiment of others (e.g., social media, social television). Frank’s passion for media effects was fostered by his interests as an aspiring film student at Virginia Tech, where his coursework in documentary production led to a fascination regarding the possible prosocial influence of film. Although he has ventured away from Hollywood aspirations, he remains driven by the desire to understand the ways that new media shape our perceptions of the world around us.

  • Claire Wardle
    Tow Center for Digital Journalism

    Claire Wardle is the Research Director and a founding member of First Draft News, a non-profit initiative committed to providing content creators and publishers with continuing research and resources. She is one of the world’s experts on user-generated content, and has led two substantial research projects investigating how it is handled by news organizations. In 2009, she was asked by BBC News to develop their Social Newsgathering and Verification training program. She went on to train over 3000 journalists in newsrooms around the world. Formerly the Research Directoar at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, she was also the Director of News Services for Storyful, and Senior Social Media Office at the UN Agency for Refugees (UNHCR). Wardle holds a PhD in Communications and an MA in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. She sits on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Information and Entertainment.

  • Lizz Winstead
    Writer, Comedian, Activist

    We welcome Lizz back as host for frank2017!

    As co-creator and former head writer of The Daily Show and co founder of Air America Radio , Lizz Winstead has helped changed the very landscape of how people get their news.

    Winstead also brought her political wit to The Daily Show as a correspondent and later to the radio waves co-hosting Unfiltered, Air America Radio’s mid-morning show, with Chuck D and Rachel Maddow.

    Known as as one of the top political satirists in America, Winstead has been recognized by all the major media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post and as Entertainment Weekly’s 100 most Creative People.

    Winstead’s first book, Lizz Free Or Die, Essays, was released in 2012 to incredible reviews, with Ms Magazine saying, Lizz Winstead is a sharp-witted truth-teller, and Lizz Free or Die will inspire anyone who has ever talked back to the television or wished they could come up with satire as insightful as The Daily Show”  

    Lizz continues doing stand-up, is working on a second book but spends most of her time at the helm of Lady Parts Justice, a reproductive rights organization that uses humor and outrage to expose anti choice zealots and mobilizes people to take action in all 50 states.

  • Rob Anderson
    U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP)

    Rob Anderson is Vice President, Global Communications, at USP, a global public health organization advancing the quality of medicines, dietary supplements and food ingredients.

    In his role at USP, he guides strategic communications initiatives to strengthen relationships with important stakeholder audiences, promote USP’s scientific work and product offerings, and improve understanding of the organization’s impact on global health around the world. He oversees teams focused on communications and media relations, digital engagement, marketing and promotions and creative services.

    In 2015, he led a research project to identify components of organizational curiosity and an assessment tool with the goal of building a team’s curiosity to achieve new discoveries and breakthroughs.

  • Dan Ariely
    Psychology & Behavioral Economics, Duke University

    Despite our intentions, why do we so often fail to act in our own best interest? Why do we promise to skip the chocolate cake, only to find ourselves drooling our way into temptation when the dessert tray rolls around? Why do we overvalue things that we’ve worked to put together? What are the forces that influence our behavior? Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University, is dedicated to answering these questions and others in order to help people live more sensible – if not rational – lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors, and his sometimes unusual experiments are consistently interesting, amusing and informative, demonstrating profound ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom.

    He is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, co-creator of the film documentary (Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies, and a three-time New York Times bestselling author. His books include Predictably IrrationalThe Upside of IrrationalityThe Honest Truth About Dishonesty, and Irrationally Yours. His next book, Payoff, will be published in November 2016.

    In 2013 Bloomberg recognized Dan as one of Top 50 Most Influential thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called “Ask Ariely.” Dan can be found at www.danariely.com.

  • Carroll Bogert
    The Marshall Project

    Carroll is president of The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organization focusing on criminal justice issues in the US. Staff journalists at The Marshall Project cover mass incarceration, race and police abuse, the death penalty, juvenile justice, and immigration, among other topics. Their articles are published in partnership with mainstream outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, Vice, Wired and many local media. In 2016, The Marshall Project became the youngest news organization ever to win the Pulitzer Prize. Bogert was previously Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, a research and advocacy organization working in 90 countries around the world. She began her career as a foreign correspondent for Newsweek, based in China, southeast Asia, and the Soviet Union.

  • Caty Borum Chattoo
    Center for Media & Social Impact, American University

    Caty Borum Chattoo is Co-Director of the Center for Media & Social Impact (CMSI), a research center and innovation lab at American University focused on media for social change; and Executive in Residence at American University’s School of Communication. Working at the intersection of social-change communication strategy, documentary production and media research, she has produced three documentary feature films (Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, The After Party and Stand Up Planet), multiple half-hour documentary TV specials, a seven-part documentary TV series (Sierra Club Chronicles), and PSA campaigns designed for social change on issues ranging from global poverty to civic engagement.

    Her social-change research, strategy and storytelling work has been featured in The New York Times, NPR, USA Today and more, and her documentaries have aired in the U.S. and internationally on the Sundance Channel, Pivot, NDTV (India), PBS World, Link TV, and KCET. Through CMSI, she recently co-created and launched a new convening and project, Story Movements, which examines story-led movements for social change. She has been a featured international and national speaker on the topic of media storytelling for social change, at film festivals as well as academic and professional convenings and she is a regular contributor to Documentary magazine, the leading trade publication for non-fiction storytelling. Formerly, she was a senior vice president in behavior-change communication at FleishmanHillard International Communications.

  • Eric Deggans
    Author & NPR TV critic

    Eric Deggans is NPR’s first full-time TV critic, crafting stories and commentaries for the network’s shows, such as Morning Edition, Here & Now and All Things Considered, along with writing material for NPR.org and the website’s blogs such as Code Switch, Monkey See and The Two Way. He came to NPR in September 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times newspaper in Florida, where he served as TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than two decades, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012 by Palgrave Macmillan

  • Ram Devineni
    Priya’s Shakti

    Ram Devineni produced and co-wrote Priya’s Shaktiand Priya’s Mirror,  a comic book and augmented reality production. The comic features a new superhero, one that has arisen in India in the wake of the brutal gang rape on a Delhi bus two years ago: Priya, a mortal woman who is raped herself, but fights back against sexual violence with the help of the goddess Parvati — and a tiger.

    The comic book was honored by UN Women as a “gender equality champion” and recently the next edition titled,“Priya’s Mirror” about acid attacks was released at the New York Film Festival at Lincoln Center, and funded by the World Bank’s WEvolve Global Initiative.

    Devineni is also a filmmaker who recently received the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival and nominated for an Independent Spirit Award. He is the founder of Rattapallax films, press, and magazine, based in New York City, São Paulo, and New Delhi.

  • James Druckman
    frank research prize finalist

    James N. Druckman is the Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University.  His article, co-authored with Toby Bolsen,  Counteracting the Politicization of Science was chosen as one of three finalists for the frank research prize.

    Druckman is also an Honorary Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research focuses on political preference formation and communication. His recent work examines how citizens make political, economic, and social decisions in various contexts (e.g., settings with multiple competing messages, online information, deliberation). He also researches the relationship between citizens’ preferences and public policy, and how political elites make decisions under varying institutional conditions.

    Druckman has published roughly 100 articles and book chapters in political science, communication, economic, science, and psychology journals. He co-authored the book Who Governs? Presidents, Public Opinion, and Manipulation (University of Chicago Press) and co-edited the Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science. He has served as editor of the journals Political Psychology and Public Opinion Quarterly as well as the University of Chicago Press’s series in American Politics. He currently is the co-Principal Investigator of Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS). He also sits on numerous advisory boards, organizing committees, prize committees, and editorial boards.

  • Bridgit Evans
    Fuel | We Power Change

    As the founder and President of Fuel | We Power Change, Bridgit is widely recognized as one of the foremost thought leaders in the culture change strategy field. Fifteen years of work at the intersection of pop culture storytelling and social justice has evolved into a vision for a new, hybrid culture change field in which creative and social justice leaders work hand-in-hand to create and distribute stories that can shape the values, beliefs and narratives. In 2008, Bridgit founded Fuel as the permanent home for collaborations with leading social change innovators. She now designs long-term culture change strategies for social justice movements that use transportive story experiences, often in the pop culture realm, to shift long-held narratives, values, beliefs and behaviors of mass audiences. Prior strategy design commissions include NYCLU/ACLU’s Policing and Culture strategy, Make It Work, National Domestic Workers Alliance’s Caring Across Generations and #BeTheHelp campaigns. Currently, Bridgit designs culture change strategy for Unbound Philanthropy and consults on narrative change and audience engagement strategies for Ford Foundation.

  • Lisa Fazio
    frank research prize finalist

    Lisa Fazio studies how people learn new information, both true and false, and how to correct errors in people’s knowledge. Her article, Knowledge Does Not Protect Against Illusory Truth, was chosen as one of three finalist for the frank research prize.  Fazio received her PhD from Duke University in 2010 and completed postdoctoral fellowships at both Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, her research focuses on improving student learning using basic principles from cognitive and developmental psychology. She examines simple knowledge such as history facts, as well as more complex forms of knowledge such as mathematics. Her research informs basic theories about learning and memory, while also having clear applications for the real world and classroom practice.

  • Charles Fishman
    Author/Journalist

    Curiosity got Charles Fishman admitted to the only bomb factory in the United States. It got him into the engine room of the largest cruise ship ever constructed. Curiosity got Fishman into the busiest maternity ward in the U.S., and to the bottom of the second deepest mine ever dug in the world. For a while, curiosity got Fishman a job as a tugboat deckhand on the Mississippi River.

    And not too long ago, Fishman spent two years thinking about curiosity fulltime, to write the #1 New York Times bestselling book, ‘A Curious Mind,’ with Hollywood producer Brian Grazer.

    Charles Fishman is an award-winning investigative reporter and bestselling author, which is to say, he’s turned curiosity into both a passion and a profession.

    In the first half of his career, Fishman worked for daily newspapers — The Washington Post, The Orlando Sentinel, and then the News & Observer in Raleigh, NC. In the second half of his career, he has been a magazine writer and the author of two other bestsellers, “The Wal-Mart Effect” and “The Big Thirst,” about our relationship with water.

    In the last five years, Fishman has become a forceful and challenging voice on the importance of water as a public issue, speaking everywhere from MIT and UCLA to Hershey chocolate and The Hague.

    He is at work on his next book, about the race to the Moon in the 1960s.

  • Andy Goodman
    The Goodman Center

    Andy Goodman is co-founder and director of The Goodman Center, which teaches communications professionals and social changemakers how to reach more people with more impact. Along with Storytelling as Best Practice, he is author of Why Bad Ads Happen to Good Causes and Why Bad Presentations Happen to Good Causes. He also publishes a monthly journal, free-range thinking, to share best practices in the field of public interest communications.

    Andy is internationally known for his speeches and workshops on storytelling, presenting, and strategic communications, and has been invited to speak at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton, the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, as well as at many national nonprofit conferences.

    He is currently developing curriculum for the College for Social Innovation and recently designed a course on storytelling and presenting skills for the African Leadership University. When not teaching, traveling, or recovering from teaching and traveling, Andy serves on the board of directors of Imagine LA, a nonprofit working to end family homelessness in Los Angeles.

  • Luisa Guaracao
    Karel Fellow

    Luisa Guaracao is a public relations major at the University of Florida. She is a published writer, a devoted student and already has experience in the nonprofit sector. In 2015, Luisa directed a two-week summer camp for more than 70 Guatemalan migrant children hosted by an organization called SALTT. Luisa’s leadership role with SALTT, as well as her involvement with the frank conference at UF, have inspired her to pursue the field of public interest communications as a career.

    For the 2016 summer, Luisa was matched with The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights – a coalition dedicated to promoting and protecting civil and human rights in the United States. Through advocacy and outreach to targeted constituencies, The Leadership Conference works toward the goal of a more open and just society.

  • Jamie Henn
    350.org

    Jamie Henn is the Co-founder and Strategy and Communications Director at 350.org, an international climate campaign. Over the past 8 years, 350.org has coordinated over 20,000 climate rallies in more than 180 countries, helped win the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, spearheaded the growing fossil fuel divestment campaign, and co-organized the largest climate march in history, the People’s Climate March. Today, 350.org continues to push the envelope of creative campaigning, while exploring the intersections between climate, racial, economic, and social justice.

    Jamie has guided 350’s strategy from its infancy as a group of seven college friends and their professor to one of the leading environmental organizations on the planet. His communications work has ranged from getting 1,200 people arrested at the White House, to producing shows with Thom Yorke and Patti Smith, to leading trainings for hundreds of Chinese youth activists. He’s a passionate believer that great campaigns need great stories. Helping to get those stories told is the adventure of a lifetime.

  • Sarah Jaffe
    Author and Journalist

    Sarah Jaffe is a Nation Institute fellow and an independent journalist. Her book Necessary Trouble: American in Revolt  is the definitive book on the movements that are poised to permanently remake American Politics. (Public Affairs Review)

    Her work has appeared in the Nation, Salon, In These Times, Washington Post, Atlantic, and more. She is the cohost of Dissent magazine’s Belabored podcast, as well as an editorial board member at Dissent and a columnist at New Labor Forum. Follow her on Twitter @sarahljaffe.

  • Leena Jayaswal
    Film & Media Arts Division, American University

    Leena Jayaswal is an award-winning photographer and documentarian with deep expertise and interest in issues that intersect race, representation and identity. Her films have been broadcast throughout the country on PBS affiliates through National Educational Telecommunications Association, and through New Day Films. She was awarded the prestigious Gracie Allen Award from the American Women in Radio and Television. Her work has been featured in critical film festivals and newspapers for the Indian diaspora. Her photography has been nationally recognized in galleries around the country. She has worked with famed photographer, Mary Ellen Mark. Jayaswal is an Associate Professor in the Film and Media Arts Division of the School of Communication at American University. She is the director of the photography concentration.

  • Ibram Kendi
    Professor and author

    Ibram X. Kendi is a New York Times best-selling author and award-winning historian at the University of Florida. His second book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction and was recently named a finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award. Described as “engrossing and relentless” by The Washington Post, Stamped has named to Best Books of 2016 lists in the Boston Globe, Kirkus, The Root, Chicago Review of Books, and Buzzfeed. Stamped has also been nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Nonfiction.

    Kendi is a hardcore humanist and softcore vegan who enjoys joking it up with friends and family, partaking in African American culture, weight lifting, reading provocative non-fiction books, discussing the issues of the day with open-minded people, and hoping and pressing for the day the New York Knicks will win an NBA championship and for the day this nation and world will be ruled by the best of humanity.

    Kendi is also the author of  The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972. His has been published in The New York Times, Salon, Black Perspectives, New York Daily News and has received research appointments and grants from a variety of universities, foundations, professional associations, and libraries, including the American Historical Association, Library of Congress, National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Lyndon B. Johnson Library & Museum, Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Brown University, Princeton University and others.

    Kendi lives in Gainesville, Florida.

  • Bobby Jones
    Peace First

    Bobby Jones is one of the nation’s most respected experts in marketing to teen and millennial audiences. He is the co-author of the new book Good is the New Cool: Market Like You Give Damn, a bold manifesto and how to guide helping marketers to address environmental, civic, and economic issues in ways that grow their business and brand, while giving marketing a renewed sense of purpose as powerful forces for good. Bobby is currently Chief Marketing and Communications Officer (CMCO) of Peace First, where he leads all of its marketing and communications efforts to help young people in all 50 states in the US and in over 90 countries around the world to be powerful peacemakers, creating compassionate solutions to global and local injustices. Prior to Peace First, Bobby was Vice President at Octagon North America, where he led the Octagon Access group, the nation’s preeminent team for global brands looking to effectively leverage sports, music and entertainment to reach millennial and multicultural consumers.

  • Trey Kay
    Us & Them

    Trey Kay is creator, host and producer of the Us & Them podcast. For years, he’s reported on how culture war battles have affected education in America. In 2009, he produced the radio documentary “The Great Textbook War,” which was honored with Peabody, Murrow, and duPont-Columbia Awards. In 2013, he produced “The Long Game: Texas’ Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom,” which he researched as a Spencer Fellow for Education Reporting at the Columbia School of Journalism. In 2005, he shared in another Peabody for his contribution to Studio 360’s “American Icons: Moby Dick.” He’s also produced for This American Life, The New Yorker Radio Hour, Marketplace, American RadioWorks, Morning Edition, Inside Appalachia and PBS Frontline. Kay has taught at the Columbia School of Journalism and at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY.

  • Shanelle Matthews
    Black Lives Matter

    Shanelle Matthews serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, a network of more than 40 chapters working to rebuild the Black liberation movement and affirm the lives of Black people.

    Shanelle is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism, legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. Previous to her work with BLM, she served as the Deputy Communications Director for the Sierra Club, leading communications strategy for Beyond Coal and worked as a strategist for the ACLU of Northern California. She believes in using communications both as a tool for social change and to win. As an alumna of Progressive Women’s Voices, Shanelle has executed her training as a spokesperson in outlets like Al Jazeera and NPR.

  • Sarah McBride
    Human Rights Campaign Foundation

    Bio: Sarah McBride is the National Press Secretary at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.  Prior to joining HRC, Sarah was the Campaigns and Communications Manager for LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress. Sarah completed her undergraduate degree at American University, where she served as student body president and made national headlines when she came out as transgender in the student newspaper.

    A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Sarah currently serves on the Board of Directors of Equality Delaware, the state’s primary LGBT-advocacy and -educational organization. In that capacity, Sarah helped lead and served as the primary spokesperson for the successful effort to add gender identity and expression to her state’s nondiscrimination and hate-crimes laws during the 2013 legislative session. Sarah has worked for Governor Jack Markell (D-DE), former Attorney General Beau Biden (D-DE), and, in 2013, interned at the White House, the first out trans woman to intern there. In 2016, Sarah became the first out transgender person to address a major party convention when she spoke at the Democratic National Convention.

  • Amy Ray
    Indigo Girls

    Many artists, musical and otherwise, use their craft to provide a visible platform for the issues they believe in. Their activism becomes interwoven with their art. Indigo Girls have long been known for voicing their political and social views in both their actions and song.  They have emphasized the need to work against sexism, racism, queer-phobia, and to work across the lines of rural and urban definitions, within all of their community-based activism, to build coalitions in order to bring true liberation to us all and truth to power.

    Amy Ray teamed up with Emily Saliers and in 1981, their independent music career began with a basement recording called Tuesday’s Children. They signed with Epic Records in 1988. Despite almost polar-opposite styles, they met on the common ground of harmony and the love of meaningful music. 

    They have an extremely loyal fan base and sold millions of albums and garnered numerous awards. To give back what was given to them, Ray founded the not-for-profit Daemon Records in 1990. The label’s mission is to support local artists at a grassroots level, to teach young artists how to further their own careers, and to keep the independent spirit alive. Ellen James Society, Kristen Hall, Gerard McHugh, James Hall and others were part of Daemon.

    Amy Ray embarked on a solo career in 2000 but still records as the Indigo Girls.  In early 2014, Ray released Goodnight Tender, her first country album. Guests on the set of tunes include Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, and Susan Tedeschi. In 2015, Indigo Girls released One Lost Day. 

  • Rashad Robinson
    Color of Change

    Rashad Robinson is the Executive Director of Color Of Change, the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. As a force driven by over one million members, Color Of Change moves decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. 

    Rashad leads the Color Of Change team in developing strategies powerful enough to change the rules of the many systems that affect Black people’s lives. Color Of Change campaigns have won justice for Black people hurt or killed by anti-Black violence, putting local authorities on notice for their abuses. They have prevented attempts to suppress the Black vote, and eliminated certain voter intimidation tactics from the conservative playbook. Long-term strategic initiatives targeting corporate industries have, for example, forced news and entertainment outlets to represent Black people accurately and fairly, and acknowledge their role in creating dangerously widespread implicit bias. Under Rashad’s leadership, Color Of Change continues to seize opportunities for advancing the power, freedom and wellbeing of Black workers, students, families, farmers, immigrants and others, wherever their freedom is limited or threatened.

    Prior to his work at Color Of Change, Rashad served as Senior Director of Media Programs at GLAAD, where he led the organization’s programmatic and advocacy work to transform the representation of LGBT people in news and entertainment media. Before GLAAD, Rashad worked on racial justice and voting rights at the Right to Vote Campaign and FairVote.

  • Jackie Salg
    Karel Fellow

    Jaquelin Salg  is an American studies major at Franklin and Marshall College – originally from New Haven, Connecticut. Jaquelin is described by her faculty sponsor as “articulate, curious, and passionate about using her education and talents to improve the lives of others.” While in high school, Jacquelin established an organization that helped families struggling to meet their food needs. The idea was to fill backpacks with canned and nonperishable foods for struggling students to pick up each Friday or before extended breaks.

    Appropriately, Jaquelin was assigned to work with Martha’s Table. For decades, Martha’s Table has provided an array of services to Washington, D.C. residents and their families. What began in 1979 as a safe place for neighborhood children to eat and learn after school has blossomed into an organization that offers access to food, education and opportunity for children and families.

  • Kimberly Sanford
    Karel Fellow

    Kimberly Sanford  attends Harvard College, majoring in studies of women, gender and sexuality, with a minor in government. She is a proud first-generation college student who is committed to helping the next generation overcome challenges however she can. At Harvard, Kimberly serves as a full-time mentor for the Crimson Summer Academy, which hosts low-income Boston students as they navigate college admissions. As a mentor, she had the opportunity to teach an introductory writing class focused on gender and sexuality – a topic she’s demonstrated an obvious passion for. Kimberly is also a Jack Kent Cooke Scholar.

    For her fellowship, Kimberly was paired with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). NRDC works to safeguard the earth – its people, its plant and animals, and the natural system on which all life depends. NRDC strives to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water and the wild.

  • Ellen Schneider
    Active Voice Lab

    Ellen has pioneered social justice media strategies for over 20 years. She founded and leads Active Voice Lab, which helps funders, media makers, advocates, and other leaders use story skillfully to advance progressive social change. She has spearheaded practical tools — such as ThePrenups and HowDoWeKnow.net — that have supported creative collaborations In the U.S. and abroad.  In 2001, with support from MacArthur and Ford Foundations, she founded Active Voice, one of the first teams to leverage story-based media to put human faces on complex social and policy issues. Ellen was formerly the executive producer of P.O.V.,/American Documentary, which she expanded from an acquisition series to an influential public media innovator. In Hollywood, she worked in development and production on cause-oriented original movies. Recent clients include media-savvy pioneers like Atlantic Philanthropies, Sundance, and Participant Media. She is currently developing an initiative called What Would it Take?, which will imagine the factors necessary to increase peer learning across sectors.

  • Andrew Slack
    Harry Potter Alliance, Imagine Better

    Andrew Slack is an Ashoka fellow, Civic Imagination fellow at Civic Hall, and former Nathan Cummings Foundation fellow. He’s the creator of both the Harry Potter Alliance (HPA) and Imagine Better.

    In the HPA, he has created a worldwide organization with close to 300 active chapters in over 30 countries on six continents. He has directed campaigns that have sent five cargo planes to Haiti, allowed all Harry Potter chocolate to be either Utz or Fair Trade certified, built libraries across the world.

    As head of Imagine Better, Andrew has directed fan-led campaigns around Star Wars  and money in politics, Back to the Future and imagination, Superman and immigration, and the Hunger Games and economic inequality. He has also begun working with fans in remixing holidays with projects like #TeachMeYouDid and assisting in Esther Day through establishing partnerships with MTV and Sesame Workshop.

    His methodology, known as “cultural acupuncture,” has been profiled in Henry Jenkins’ recent book, “By Any Media Necessary,” in the PBS documentary, “Is School Enough?,” and helped influence a major white paper that set the stage for a 65 million dollar MacArthur study.

    Andrew has been profiled by the New Yorker, NYT, NPR, Fast Company, Forbes, etc and he has written for both the LA Times and CNN.com He has served as keynote speaker at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum, the American Library Association’s midwinter festival, was chair of MacArthur’s Digital Media Learning’s Ignite Talks, and has done talks at TEDx, Comic Con, Futures of Entertainment, and SXSW.

  • Brian Southwell, Ph.D.
    RTI International, Duke University & UNC

    Brian’s hats are many! He is the Director of the Science in the Public Sphere Program in the Center for Communication Science at RTI International, an independent, nonprofit research institute. He is an Adjunct Professor with Duke University, teaching through the Social Science Research Institute and Energy Initiative, and is Research Professor (of Mass Communication) and Adjunct Associate Professor (of Health Behavior) at UNC Chapel Hill. In addition, Southwell hosts The Measure of Everyday Life, a weekly public radio show produced by WNCU in the Raleigh-Durham, NC, media market.

    Previously, Dr. Southwell served the University of Minnesota as Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies (Mass Communication) with an appointment in Public Health. Additionally, he has worked for nonprofit and government organizations including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Ogilvy Public Relations. His research addressed issues such as campaign measurement and evaluation, the roles of social networks, lifespan development, and misinformation. At RTI, Dr. Southwell has led numerous projects for federal agencies.

    Dr. Southwell’s book, Social Networks and Popular Understanding of Science and Health, has been widely reviewed and recognized as an outstanding publication in 2015.

  • Taylor Tringali
    Florida Fellow

    Taylor Tringali is a senior studying sociology and communications at the University of Florida.

    Taylor was chosen to be a Florida Fellow in the summer of 2016 with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation in Fort Myers, Florida. She was matched with the Alliance for the Arts, a non-profit arts organization, where she  updated their social media platforms, created a strategic campaign to advocate for the importance of arts education, collected data for the Economic Impact Study and more.

    Taylor has dedicated herself to community service through her service sorority and has worked to become a voice for women on campus as the Marketing Director for the Women’s Student Association. She has also volunteered with various community social service organizations throughout her college career.

  • Sander Van der Linden
    frank research prize finalist

    Sander van der Linden is an Assistant Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, where he directs the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab. He is also a Fellow in Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Churchill College, University of Cambridge and a research affiliate with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication at Yale University.

    Prior to Cambridge, van der Linden was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychology and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at Yale University. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) exploring the social psychology of climate change.

    Sander has won numerous awards for his research on social influence, judgment, communication, and decision-making, including awards from the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) and the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP). His article, The Conspiracy-Effect: Exposure to Conspiracy Theories (about Global Warming) Decreases Prosocial Behavior and Science Acceptance was selected as one of three frank research prize finalists. He was nominated as one of the “Top Thinkers Under 30” by Pacific Standard Magazine (although he is now 30!) and actively strives to conduct psychological research in the public interest. His work has been widely publicized in the media, including outlets such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, NPR, and the BBC.

  • Frank Waddell
    College of Journalism and Communication

    Frank is interested in the ways that nascent trends in digital media (e.g., dual screen interaction) are moderating the psychological effects that media elicit. His research focuses on the ability of emerging media to serve as a source of communication, both individually and collectively. This includes technologies that either allow users to express themselves (e.g., avatar-mediated communication, video games) or that afford the ability to monitor the collective sentiment of others (e.g., social media, social television). Frank’s passion for media effects was fostered by his interests as an aspiring film student at Virginia Tech, where his coursework in documentary production led to a fascination regarding the possible prosocial influence of film. Although he has ventured away from Hollywood aspirations, he remains driven by the desire to understand the ways that new media shape our perceptions of the world around us.

  • Claire Wardle
    Tow Center for Digital Journalism

    Claire Wardle is the Research Director and a founding member of First Draft News, a non-profit initiative committed to providing content creators and publishers with continuing research and resources. She is one of the world’s experts on user-generated content, and has led two substantial research projects investigating how it is handled by news organizations. In 2009, she was asked by BBC News to develop their Social Newsgathering and Verification training program. She went on to train over 3000 journalists in newsrooms around the world. Formerly the Research Directoar at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, she was also the Director of News Services for Storyful, and Senior Social Media Office at the UN Agency for Refugees (UNHCR). Wardle holds a PhD in Communications and an MA in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. She sits on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Information and Entertainment.

  • Lizz Winstead
    Writer, Comedian, Activist

    We welcome Lizz back as host for frank2017!

    As co-creator and former head writer of The Daily Show and co founder of Air America Radio , Lizz Winstead has helped changed the very landscape of how people get their news.

    Winstead also brought her political wit to The Daily Show as a correspondent and later to the radio waves co-hosting Unfiltered, Air America Radio’s mid-morning show, with Chuck D and Rachel Maddow.

    Known as as one of the top political satirists in America, Winstead has been recognized by all the major media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post and as Entertainment Weekly’s 100 most Creative People.

    Winstead’s first book, Lizz Free Or Die, Essays, was released in 2012 to incredible reviews, with Ms Magazine saying, Lizz Winstead is a sharp-witted truth-teller, and Lizz Free or Die will inspire anyone who has ever talked back to the television or wished they could come up with satire as insightful as The Daily Show”  

    Lizz continues doing stand-up, is working on a second book but spends most of her time at the helm of Lady Parts Justice, a reproductive rights organization that uses humor and outrage to expose anti choice zealots and mobilizes people to take action in all 50 states.

  • Rob Anderson
    U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP)

    Rob Anderson is Vice President, Global Communications, at USP, a global public health organization advancing the quality of medicines, dietary supplements and food ingredients.

    In his role at USP, he guides strategic communications initiatives to strengthen relationships with important stakeholder audiences, promote USP’s scientific work and product offerings, and improve understanding of the organization’s impact on global health around the world. He oversees teams focused on communications and media relations, digital engagement, marketing and promotions and creative services.

    In 2015, he led a research project to identify components of organizational curiosity and an assessment tool with the goal of building a team’s curiosity to achieve new discoveries and breakthroughs.

  • Dan Ariely
    Psychology & Behavioral Economics, Duke University

    Despite our intentions, why do we so often fail to act in our own best interest? Why do we promise to skip the chocolate cake, only to find ourselves drooling our way into temptation when the dessert tray rolls around? Why do we overvalue things that we’ve worked to put together? What are the forces that influence our behavior? Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University, is dedicated to answering these questions and others in order to help people live more sensible – if not rational – lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors, and his sometimes unusual experiments are consistently interesting, amusing and informative, demonstrating profound ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom.

    He is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, co-creator of the film documentary (Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies, and a three-time New York Times bestselling author. His books include Predictably IrrationalThe Upside of IrrationalityThe Honest Truth About Dishonesty, and Irrationally Yours. His next book, Payoff, will be published in November 2016.

    In 2013 Bloomberg recognized Dan as one of Top 50 Most Influential thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called “Ask Ariely.” Dan can be found at www.danariely.com.

  • Carroll Bogert
    The Marshall Project

    Carroll is president of The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organization focusing on criminal justice issues in the US. Staff journalists at The Marshall Project cover mass incarceration, race and police abuse, the death penalty, juvenile justice, and immigration, among other topics. Their articles are published in partnership with mainstream outlets such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, Vice, Wired and many local media. In 2016, The Marshall Project became the youngest news organization ever to win the Pulitzer Prize. Bogert was previously Deputy Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, a research and advocacy organization working in 90 countries around the world. She began her career as a foreign correspondent for Newsweek, based in China, southeast Asia, and the Soviet Union.

  • Caty Borum Chattoo
    Center for Media & Social Impact, American University

    Caty Borum Chattoo is Co-Director of the Center for Media & Social Impact (CMSI), a research center and innovation lab at American University focused on media for social change; and Executive in Residence at American University’s School of Communication. Working at the intersection of social-change communication strategy, documentary production and media research, she has produced three documentary feature films (Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, The After Party and Stand Up Planet), multiple half-hour documentary TV specials, a seven-part documentary TV series (Sierra Club Chronicles), and PSA campaigns designed for social change on issues ranging from global poverty to civic engagement.

    Her social-change research, strategy and storytelling work has been featured in The New York Times, NPR, USA Today and more, and her documentaries have aired in the U.S. and internationally on the Sundance Channel, Pivot, NDTV (India), PBS World, Link TV, and KCET. Through CMSI, she recently co-created and launched a new convening and project, Story Movements, which examines story-led movements for social change. She has been a featured international and national speaker on the topic of media storytelling for social change, at film festivals as well as academic and professional convenings and she is a regular contributor to Documentary magazine, the leading trade publication for non-fiction storytelling. Formerly, she was a senior vice president in behavior-change communication at FleishmanHillard International Communications.

  • Eric Deggans
    Author & NPR TV critic

    Eric Deggans is NPR’s first full-time TV critic, crafting stories and commentaries for the network’s shows, such as Morning Edition, Here & Now and All Things Considered, along with writing material for NPR.org and the website’s blogs such as Code Switch, Monkey See and The Two Way. He came to NPR in September 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times newspaper in Florida, where he served as TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than two decades, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012 by Palgrave Macmillan

  • Ram Devineni
    Priya’s Shakti

    Ram Devineni produced and co-wrote Priya’s Shaktiand Priya’s Mirror,  a comic book and augmented reality production. The comic features a new superhero, one that has arisen in India in the wake of the brutal gang rape on a Delhi bus two years ago: Priya, a mortal woman who is raped herself, but fights back against sexual violence with the help of the goddess Parvati — and a tiger.

    The comic book was honored by UN Women as a “gender equality champion” and recently the next edition titled,“Priya’s Mirror” about acid attacks was released at the New York Film Festival at Lincoln Center, and funded by the World Bank’s WEvolve Global Initiative.

    Devineni is also a filmmaker who recently received the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance Film Festival and nominated for an Independent Spirit Award. He is the founder of Rattapallax films, press, and magazine, based in New York City, São Paulo, and New Delhi.

  • James Druckman
    frank research prize finalist

    James N. Druckman is the Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University.  His article, co-authored with Toby Bolsen,  Counteracting the Politicization of Science was chosen as one of three finalists for the frank research prize.

    Druckman is also an Honorary Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research focuses on political preference formation and communication. His recent work examines how citizens make political, economic, and social decisions in various contexts (e.g., settings with multiple competing messages, online information, deliberation). He also researches the relationship between citizens’ preferences and public policy, and how political elites make decisions under varying institutional conditions.

    Druckman has published roughly 100 articles and book chapters in political science, communication, economic, science, and psychology journals. He co-authored the book Who Governs? Presidents, Public Opinion, and Manipulation (University of Chicago Press) and co-edited the Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science. He has served as editor of the journals Political Psychology and Public Opinion Quarterly as well as the University of Chicago Press’s series in American Politics. He currently is the co-Principal Investigator of Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS). He also sits on numerous advisory boards, organizing committees, prize committees, and editorial boards.

  • Bridgit Evans
    Fuel | We Power Change

    As the founder and President of Fuel | We Power Change, Bridgit is widely recognized as one of the foremost thought leaders in the culture change strategy field. Fifteen years of work at the intersection of pop culture storytelling and social justice has evolved into a vision for a new, hybrid culture change field in which creative and social justice leaders work hand-in-hand to create and distribute stories that can shape the values, beliefs and narratives. In 2008, Bridgit founded Fuel as the permanent home for collaborations with leading social change innovators. She now designs long-term culture change strategies for social justice movements that use transportive story experiences, often in the pop culture realm, to shift long-held narratives, values, beliefs and behaviors of mass audiences. Prior strategy design commissions include NYCLU/ACLU’s Policing and Culture strategy, Make It Work, National Domestic Workers Alliance’s Caring Across Generations and #BeTheHelp campaigns. Currently, Bridgit designs culture change strategy for Unbound Philanthropy and consults on narrative change and audience engagement strategies for Ford Foundation.

  • Lisa Fazio
    frank research prize finalist

    Lisa Fazio studies how people learn new information, both true and false, and how to correct errors in people’s knowledge. Her article, Knowledge Does Not Protect Against Illusory Truth, was chosen as one of three finalist for the frank research prize.  Fazio received her PhD from Duke University in 2010 and completed postdoctoral fellowships at both Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. Currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, her research focuses on improving student learning using basic principles from cognitive and developmental psychology. She examines simple knowledge such as history facts, as well as more complex forms of knowledge such as mathematics. Her research informs basic theories about learning and memory, while also having clear applications for the real world and classroom practice.

  • Charles Fishman
    Author/Journalist

    Curiosity got Charles Fishman admitted to the only bomb factory in the United States. It got him into the engine room of the largest cruise ship ever constructed. Curiosity got Fishman into the busiest maternity ward in the U.S., and to the bottom of the second deepest mine ever dug in the world. For a while, curiosity got Fishman a job as a tugboat deckhand on the Mississippi River.

    And not too long ago, Fishman spent two years thinking about curiosity fulltime, to write the #1 New York Times bestselling book, ‘A Curious Mind,’ with Hollywood producer Brian Grazer.

    Charles Fishman is an award-winning investigative reporter and bestselling author, which is to say, he’s turned curiosity into both a passion and a profession.

    In the first half of his career, Fishman worked for daily newspapers — The Washington Post, The Orlando Sentinel, and then the News & Observer in Raleigh, NC. In the second half of his career, he has been a magazine writer and the author of two other bestsellers, “The Wal-Mart Effect” and “The Big Thirst,” about our relationship with water.

    In the last five years, Fishman has become a forceful and challenging voice on the importance of water as a public issue, speaking everywhere from MIT and UCLA to Hershey chocolate and The Hague.

    He is at work on his next book, about the race to the Moon in the 1960s.

  • Andy Goodman
    The Goodman Center

    Andy Goodman is co-founder and director of The Goodman Center, which teaches communications professionals and social changemakers how to reach more people with more impact. Along with Storytelling as Best Practice, he is author of Why Bad Ads Happen to Good Causes and Why Bad Presentations Happen to Good Causes. He also publishes a monthly journal, free-range thinking, to share best practices in the field of public interest communications.

    Andy is internationally known for his speeches and workshops on storytelling, presenting, and strategic communications, and has been invited to speak at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton, the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, as well as at many national nonprofit conferences.

    He is currently developing curriculum for the College for Social Innovation and recently designed a course on storytelling and presenting skills for the African Leadership University. When not teaching, traveling, or recovering from teaching and traveling, Andy serves on the board of directors of Imagine LA, a nonprofit working to end family homelessness in Los Angeles.

  • Luisa Guaracao
    Karel Fellow

    Luisa Guaracao is a public relations major at the University of Florida. She is a published writer, a devoted student and already has experience in the nonprofit sector. In 2015, Luisa directed a two-week summer camp for more than 70 Guatemalan migrant children hosted by an organization called SALTT. Luisa’s leadership role with SALTT, as well as her involvement with the frank conference at UF, have inspired her to pursue the field of public interest communications as a career.

    For the 2016 summer, Luisa was matched with The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights – a coalition dedicated to promoting and protecting civil and human rights in the United States. Through advocacy and outreach to targeted constituencies, The Leadership Conference works toward the goal of a more open and just society.

  • Jamie Henn
    350.org

    Jamie Henn is the Co-founder and Strategy and Communications Director at 350.org, an international climate campaign. Over the past 8 years, 350.org has coordinated over 20,000 climate rallies in more than 180 countries, helped win the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline, spearheaded the growing fossil fuel divestment campaign, and co-organized the largest climate march in history, the People’s Climate March. Today, 350.org continues to push the envelope of creative campaigning, while exploring the intersections between climate, racial, economic, and social justice.

    Jamie has guided 350’s strategy from its infancy as a group of seven college friends and their professor to one of the leading environmental organizations on the planet. His communications work has ranged from getting 1,200 people arrested at the White House, to producing shows with Thom Yorke and Patti Smith, to leading trainings for hundreds of Chinese youth activists. He’s a passionate believer that great campaigns need great stories. Helping to get those stories told is the adventure of a lifetime.

  • Sarah Jaffe
    Author and Journalist

    Sarah Jaffe is a Nation Institute fellow and an independent journalist. Her book Necessary Trouble: American in Revolt  is the definitive book on the movements that are poised to permanently remake American Politics. (Public Affairs Review)

    Her work has appeared in the Nation, Salon, In These Times, Washington Post, Atlantic, and more. She is the cohost of Dissent magazine’s Belabored podcast, as well as an editorial board member at Dissent and a columnist at New Labor Forum. Follow her on Twitter @sarahljaffe.

  • Leena Jayaswal
    Film & Media Arts Division, American University

    Leena Jayaswal is an award-winning photographer and documentarian with deep expertise and interest in issues that intersect race, representation and identity. Her films have been broadcast throughout the country on PBS affiliates through National Educational Telecommunications Association, and through New Day Films. She was awarded the prestigious Gracie Allen Award from the American Women in Radio and Television. Her work has been featured in critical film festivals and newspapers for the Indian diaspora. Her photography has been nationally recognized in galleries around the country. She has worked with famed photographer, Mary Ellen Mark. Jayaswal is an Associate Professor in the Film and Media Arts Division of the School of Communication at American University. She is the director of the photography concentration.

  • Ibram Kendi
    Professor and author

    Ibram X. Kendi is a New York Times best-selling author and award-winning historian at the University of Florida. His second book, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction and was recently named a finalist for the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award. Described as “engrossing and relentless” by The Washington Post, Stamped has named to Best Books of 2016 lists in the Boston Globe, Kirkus, The Root, Chicago Review of Books, and Buzzfeed. Stamped has also been nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Nonfiction.

    Kendi is a hardcore humanist and softcore vegan who enjoys joking it up with friends and family, partaking in African American culture, weight lifting, reading provocative non-fiction books, discussing the issues of the day with open-minded people, and hoping and pressing for the day the New York Knicks will win an NBA championship and for the day this nation and world will be ruled by the best of humanity.

    Kendi is also the author of  The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972. His has been published in The New York Times, Salon, Black Perspectives, New York Daily News and has received research appointments and grants from a variety of universities, foundations, professional associations, and libraries, including the American Historical Association, Library of Congress, National Academy of Education, Spencer Foundation, Lyndon B. Johnson Library & Museum, Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Brown University, Princeton University and others.

    Kendi lives in Gainesville, Florida.

  • Bobby Jones
    Peace First

    Bobby Jones is one of the nation’s most respected experts in marketing to teen and millennial audiences. He is the co-author of the new book Good is the New Cool: Market Like You Give Damn, a bold manifesto and how to guide helping marketers to address environmental, civic, and economic issues in ways that grow their business and brand, while giving marketing a renewed sense of purpose as powerful forces for good. Bobby is currently Chief Marketing and Communications Officer (CMCO) of Peace First, where he leads all of its marketing and communications efforts to help young people in all 50 states in the US and in over 90 countries around the world to be powerful peacemakers, creating compassionate solutions to global and local injustices. Prior to Peace First, Bobby was Vice President at Octagon North America, where he led the Octagon Access group, the nation’s preeminent team for global brands looking to effectively leverage sports, music and entertainment to reach millennial and multicultural consumers.

  • Trey Kay
    Us & Them

    Trey Kay is creator, host and producer of the Us & Them podcast. For years, he’s reported on how culture war battles have affected education in America. In 2009, he produced the radio documentary “The Great Textbook War,” which was honored with Peabody, Murrow, and duPont-Columbia Awards. In 2013, he produced “The Long Game: Texas’ Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom,” which he researched as a Spencer Fellow for Education Reporting at the Columbia School of Journalism. In 2005, he shared in another Peabody for his contribution to Studio 360’s “American Icons: Moby Dick.” He’s also produced for This American Life, The New Yorker Radio Hour, Marketplace, American RadioWorks, Morning Edition, Inside Appalachia and PBS Frontline. Kay has taught at the Columbia School of Journalism and at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY.

  • Shanelle Matthews
    Black Lives Matter

    Shanelle Matthews serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, a network of more than 40 chapters working to rebuild the Black liberation movement and affirm the lives of Black people.

    Shanelle is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism, legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. Previous to her work with BLM, she served as the Deputy Communications Director for the Sierra Club, leading communications strategy for Beyond Coal and worked as a strategist for the ACLU of Northern California. She believes in using communications both as a tool for social change and to win. As an alumna of Progressive Women’s Voices, Shanelle has executed her training as a spokesperson in outlets like Al Jazeera and NPR.

  • Sarah McBride
    Human Rights Campaign Foundation

    Bio: Sarah McBride is the National Press Secretary at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.  Prior to joining HRC, Sarah was the Campaigns and Communications Manager for LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress. Sarah completed her undergraduate degree at American University, where she served as student body president and made national headlines when she came out as transgender in the student newspaper.

    A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Sarah currently serves on the Board of Directors of Equality Delaware, the state’s primary LGBT-advocacy and -educational organization. In that capacity, Sarah helped lead and served as the primary spokesperson for the successful effort to add gender identity and expression to her state’s nondiscrimination and hate-crimes laws during the 2013 legislative session. Sarah has worked for Governor Jack Markell (D-DE), former Attorney General Beau Biden (D-DE), and, in 2013, interned at the White House, the first out trans woman to intern there. In 2016, Sarah became the first out transgender person to address a major party convention when she spoke at the Democratic National Convention.

  • Amy Ray
    Indigo Girls

    Many artists, musical and otherwise, use their craft to provide a visible platform for the issues they believe in. Their activism becomes interwoven with their art. Indigo Girls have long been known for voicing their political and social views in both their actions and song.  They have emphasized the need to work against sexism, racism, queer-phobia, and to work across the lines of rural and urban definitions, within all of their community-based activism, to build coalitions in order to bring true liberation to us all and truth to power.

    Amy Ray teamed up with Emily Saliers and in 1981, their independent music career began with a basement recording called Tuesday’s Children. They signed with Epic Records in 1988. Despite almost polar-opposite styles, they met on the common ground of harmony and the love of meaningful music. 

    They have an extremely loyal fan base and sold millions of albums and garnered numerous awards. To give back what was given to them, Ray founded the not-for-profit Daemon Records in 1990. The label’s mission is to support local artists at a grassroots level, to teach young artists how to further their own careers, and to keep the independent spirit alive. Ellen James Society, Kristen Hall, Gerard McHugh, James Hall and others were part of Daemon.

    Amy Ray embarked on a solo career in 2000 but still records as the Indigo Girls.  In early 2014, Ray released Goodnight Tender, her first country album. Guests on the set of tunes include Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, and Susan Tedeschi. In 2015, Indigo Girls released One Lost Day. 

  • Rashad Robinson
    Color of Change

    Rashad Robinson is the Executive Director of Color Of Change, the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. As a force driven by over one million members, Color Of Change moves decision makers in corporations and government to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people, and all people. 

    Rashad leads the Color Of Change team in developing strategies powerful enough to change the rules of the many systems that affect Black people’s lives. Color Of Change campaigns have won justice for Black people hurt or killed by anti-Black violence, putting local authorities on notice for their abuses. They have prevented attempts to suppress the Black vote, and eliminated certain voter intimidation tactics from the conservative playbook. Long-term strategic initiatives targeting corporate industries have, for example, forced news and entertainment outlets to represent Black people accurately and fairly, and acknowledge their role in creating dangerously widespread implicit bias. Under Rashad’s leadership, Color Of Change continues to seize opportunities for advancing the power, freedom and wellbeing of Black workers, students, families, farmers, immigrants and others, wherever their freedom is limited or threatened.

    Prior to his work at Color Of Change, Rashad served as Senior Director of Media Programs at GLAAD, where he led the organization’s programmatic and advocacy work to transform the representation of LGBT people in news and entertainment media. Before GLAAD, Rashad worked on racial justice and voting rights at the Right to Vote Campaign and FairVote.

  • Jackie Salg
    Karel Fellow

    Jaquelin Salg  is an American studies major at Franklin and Marshall College – originally from New Haven, Connecticut. Jaquelin is described by her faculty sponsor as “articulate, curious, and passionate about using her education and talents to improve the lives of others.” While in high school, Jacquelin established an organization that helped families struggling to meet their food needs. The idea was to fill backpacks with canned and nonperishable foods for struggling students to pick up each Friday or before extended breaks.

    Appropriately, Jaquelin was assigned to work with Martha’s Table. For decades, Martha’s Table has provided an array of services to Washington, D.C. residents and their families. What began in 1979 as a safe place for neighborhood children to eat and learn after school has blossomed into an organization that offers access to food, education and opportunity for children and families.

  • Kimberly Sanford
    Karel Fellow

    Kimberly Sanford  attends Harvard College, majoring in studies of women, gender and sexuality, with a minor in government. She is a proud first-generation college student who is committed to helping the next generation overcome challenges however she can. At Harvard, Kimberly serves as a full-time mentor for the Crimson Summer Academy, which hosts low-income Boston students as they navigate college admissions. As a mentor, she had the opportunity to teach an introductory writing class focused on gender and sexuality – a topic she’s demonstrated an obvious passion for. Kimberly is also a Jack Kent Cooke Scholar.

    For her fellowship, Kimberly was paired with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). NRDC works to safeguard the earth – its people, its plant and animals, and the natural system on which all life depends. NRDC strives to ensure the rights of all people to the air, the water and the wild.

  • Ellen Schneider
    Active Voice Lab

    Ellen has pioneered social justice media strategies for over 20 years. She founded and leads Active Voice Lab, which helps funders, media makers, advocates, and other leaders use story skillfully to advance progressive social change. She has spearheaded practical tools — such as ThePrenups and HowDoWeKnow.net — that have supported creative collaborations In the U.S. and abroad.  In 2001, with support from MacArthur and Ford Foundations, she founded Active Voice, one of the first teams to leverage story-based media to put human faces on complex social and policy issues. Ellen was formerly the executive producer of P.O.V.,/American Documentary, which she expanded from an acquisition series to an influential public media innovator. In Hollywood, she worked in development and production on cause-oriented original movies. Recent clients include media-savvy pioneers like Atlantic Philanthropies, Sundance, and Participant Media. She is currently developing an initiative called What Would it Take?, which will imagine the factors necessary to increase peer learning across sectors.

  • Andrew Slack
    Harry Potter Alliance, Imagine Better

    Andrew Slack is an Ashoka fellow, Civic Imagination fellow at Civic Hall, and former Nathan Cummings Foundation fellow. He’s the creator of both the Harry Potter Alliance (HPA) and Imagine Better.

    In the HPA, he has created a worldwide organization with close to 300 active chapters in over 30 countries on six continents. He has directed campaigns that have sent five cargo planes to Haiti, allowed all Harry Potter chocolate to be either Utz or Fair Trade certified, built libraries across the world.

    As head of Imagine Better, Andrew has directed fan-led campaigns around Star Wars  and money in politics, Back to the Future and imagination, Superman and immigration, and the Hunger Games and economic inequality. He has also begun working with fans in remixing holidays with projects like #TeachMeYouDid and assisting in Esther Day through establishing partnerships with MTV and Sesame Workshop.

    His methodology, known as “cultural acupuncture,” has been profiled in Henry Jenkins’ recent book, “By Any Media Necessary,” in the PBS documentary, “Is School Enough?,” and helped influence a major white paper that set the stage for a 65 million dollar MacArthur study.

    Andrew has been profiled by the New Yorker, NYT, NPR, Fast Company, Forbes, etc and he has written for both the LA Times and CNN.com He has served as keynote speaker at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum, the American Library Association’s midwinter festival, was chair of MacArthur’s Digital Media Learning’s Ignite Talks, and has done talks at TEDx, Comic Con, Futures of Entertainment, and SXSW.

  • Brian Southwell, Ph.D.
    RTI International, Duke University & UNC

    Brian’s hats are many! He is the Director of the Science in the Public Sphere Program in the Center for Communication Science at RTI International, an independent, nonprofit research institute. He is an Adjunct Professor with Duke University, teaching through the Social Science Research Institute and Energy Initiative, and is Research Professor (of Mass Communication) and Adjunct Associate Professor (of Health Behavior) at UNC Chapel Hill. In addition, Southwell hosts The Measure of Everyday Life, a weekly public radio show produced by WNCU in the Raleigh-Durham, NC, media market.

    Previously, Dr. Southwell served the University of Minnesota as Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies (Mass Communication) with an appointment in Public Health. Additionally, he has worked for nonprofit and government organizations including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Ogilvy Public Relations. His research addressed issues such as campaign measurement and evaluation, the roles of social networks, lifespan development, and misinformation. At RTI, Dr. Southwell has led numerous projects for federal agencies.

    Dr. Southwell’s book, Social Networks and Popular Understanding of Science and Health, has been widely reviewed and recognized as an outstanding publication in 2015.

  • Taylor Tringali
    Florida Fellow

    Taylor Tringali is a senior studying sociology and communications at the University of Florida.

    Taylor was chosen to be a Florida Fellow in the summer of 2016 with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation in Fort Myers, Florida. She was matched with the Alliance for the Arts, a non-profit arts organization, where she  updated their social media platforms, created a strategic campaign to advocate for the importance of arts education, collected data for the Economic Impact Study and more.

    Taylor has dedicated herself to community service through her service sorority and has worked to become a voice for women on campus as the Marketing Director for the Women’s Student Association. She has also volunteered with various community social service organizations throughout her college career.

  • Sander Van der Linden
    frank research prize finalist

    Sander van der Linden is an Assistant Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge, where he directs the Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab. He is also a Fellow in Psychological and Behavioral Sciences at Churchill College, University of Cambridge and a research affiliate with the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication at Yale University.

    Prior to Cambridge, van der Linden was a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychology and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at Yale University. He received his PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) exploring the social psychology of climate change.

    Sander has won numerous awards for his research on social influence, judgment, communication, and decision-making, including awards from the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) and the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP). His article, The Conspiracy-Effect: Exposure to Conspiracy Theories (about Global Warming) Decreases Prosocial Behavior and Science Acceptance was selected as one of three frank research prize finalists. He was nominated as one of the “Top Thinkers Under 30” by Pacific Standard Magazine (although he is now 30!) and actively strives to conduct psychological research in the public interest. His work has been widely publicized in the media, including outlets such as the New York Times, Time Magazine, NPR, and the BBC.

  • Frank Waddell
    College of Journalism and Communication

    Frank is interested in the ways that nascent trends in digital media (e.g., dual screen interaction) are moderating the psychological effects that media elicit. His research focuses on the ability of emerging media to serve as a source of communication, both individually and collectively. This includes technologies that either allow users to express themselves (e.g., avatar-mediated communication, video games) or that afford the ability to monitor the collective sentiment of others (e.g., social media, social television). Frank’s passion for media effects was fostered by his interests as an aspiring film student at Virginia Tech, where his coursework in documentary production led to a fascination regarding the possible prosocial influence of film. Although he has ventured away from Hollywood aspirations, he remains driven by the desire to understand the ways that new media shape our perceptions of the world around us.

  • Claire Wardle
    Tow Center for Digital Journalism

    Claire Wardle is the Research Director and a founding member of First Draft News, a non-profit initiative committed to providing content creators and publishers with continuing research and resources. She is one of the world’s experts on user-generated content, and has led two substantial research projects investigating how it is handled by news organizations. In 2009, she was asked by BBC News to develop their Social Newsgathering and Verification training program. She went on to train over 3000 journalists in newsrooms around the world. Formerly the Research Directoar at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism, she was also the Director of News Services for Storyful, and Senior Social Media Office at the UN Agency for Refugees (UNHCR). Wardle holds a PhD in Communications and an MA in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. She sits on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on the Future of Information and Entertainment.

  • Lizz Winstead
    Writer, Comedian, Activist

    We welcome Lizz back as host for frank2017!

    As co-creator and former head writer of The Daily Show and co founder of Air America Radio , Lizz Winstead has helped changed the very landscape of how people get their news.

    Winstead also brought her political wit to The Daily Show as a correspondent and later to the radio waves co-hosting Unfiltered, Air America Radio’s mid-morning show, with Chuck D and Rachel Maddow.

    Known as as one of the top political satirists in America, Winstead has been recognized by all the major media outlets including The New York Times, The Washington Post and as Entertainment Weekly’s 100 most Creative People.

    Winstead’s first book, Lizz Free Or Die, Essays, was released in 2012 to incredible reviews, with Ms Magazine saying, Lizz Winstead is a sharp-witted truth-teller, and Lizz Free or Die will inspire anyone who has ever talked back to the television or wished they could come up with satire as insightful as The Daily Show”  

    Lizz continues doing stand-up, is working on a second book but spends most of her time at the helm of Lady Parts Justice, a reproductive rights organization that uses humor and outrage to expose anti choice zealots and mobilizes people to take action in all 50 states.

2016 Best Nonprofit Conference

What our frank2016 attendees are telling their colleagues?

  • “How wonderful it was to be with a group of interesting inspiring people and  it is rare I get to be with my ‘tribe’.
  • “Want to get a pulse on what’s going on in public interest communications? Go to frank. It’s full of dedicated people doing it in the here and now.”

  • “You gotta go. Just go. Don’t argue.”